Tim White

Study: Older Moms Live Longer
Study: Older Moms Live Longer

A new Boston University study says that moms who bear children after the age of 33 have a greater chance of living longer than women who had their last child before 30, reports The Washington Post. “We think the same genes that allow a woman to naturally have a kid at an older age are the same genes that play a really important role in slowing down the rate of aging and decreasing the risk for age-related diseases, such as heart attacks, stroke, diabetes and cancer,” said Thomas Perls, a professor who specializes in geriatrics at Boston University Medical Center. He went on to cite Halle Berry, who had her second child at age 46, as an example of someone who probably has those genes.

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Today in entertainment history: Jan. 26

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A look back at some of Hollywood's most memorable headlines.

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This weekend in entertainment history

In this film publicity image released by 20th Century Fox, the character Neytiri, voiced by Zoe Saldana, left, and the character Jake, voiced by Sam Worthington are shown in a scene from, "Avatar." The film was nominated Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2010 for an Oscar for best picture. The 82nd Academy Awards will be presented on March 7.

A look back on some of Hollywood's most notable headlines.

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If regular people picked the Oscars, ‘American Sniper’ would win

In this image released by Warner Bros. Pictures, Kyle Gallner, left, and Bradley Cooper appear in a scene from "American Sniper."

If ordinary Americans voted for the Academy Awards, the portrait of a sharpshooter in the Iraq war, would be the best picture winner.

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Pharrell heading to ‘The Simpsons’

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The "Happy" hitmaker and the famous Vivienne Westwood hat he wore to the Grammys are heading to Springfield.

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Regina Hall almost became a nun

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The "Think Like a Man" star missed out on becoming a nun because some of her "numbers" were too high.