Tim White

New Guidelines:  Give Babies Peanuts and Eggs Early
New Guidelines: Give Babies Peanuts and Eggs Early

New guidelines that are out amid rising rates of children’s food allergies reverses what had been the previous recommendation, now advising that the most allergenic foods, such as peanuts, eggs, milk, soy and shellfish, should be introduced to babies at ages four to six months as a way to prevent food allergies. The guidelines from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology comes as new scientific data suggests that early introduction of highly allergenic foods may reduce children’s risk for developing food allergies. Back in 2000, the American Academy of Pediatrics advised delaying milk until high-risk kids were one year old; eggs until they were two, and peanuts, shellfish, tree nuts, and fish until they were three. But in 2008, the AAP said there was little evidence delaying allergenic foods prevents food allergies, however it didn’t offer any guidelines on when to introduce those foods.

  • Up to six million children in the U.S. have food      allergies, and the rate has increased by nearly 20 percent since 1997 for      unknown reasons.
  • About 90 percent of food allergies are triggered by      just eight foods: milk; soy; wheat; peanuts; tree nuts; shellfish; eggs;      and fish.

News: Recent Headlines

in Entertainment

Coming soon: The Mustache Hall of Fame

burtreynolds

There are halls of fame for everything from baseball to rock 'n' roll, so why not those with a hairy upper lip?

in Black Friday, Lifestyle, National

Walmart ups ante on holiday shopping

walmart

Starting Saturday, Walmart will do whatever it takes to rope in holiday shoppers however they want to buy.

in Entertainment

Inspiration for ‘Harry Potter’ nemesis revealed

harrypotter

J.K. Rowling says the much-hated character Dolores Umbridge is based on a teacher to whom she took an instant dislike.

in Lifestyle

App turns your smartphone into a breathalyzer

beer

Alcohoot turns your smartphone into a portable, personal breathalyzer.